MIT Inventions and ICA Soundscapes

Researchers Lwam and Blu looking at a Kevin Beasley sculpture.

Researchers Lwam and Blu looking at a Kevin Beasley sculpture.

Researcher Isaiah looking at a painting by Caitlin Keogh.

Researcher Isaiah looking at a painting by Caitlin Keogh.

The past two weeks of the Our Riverside have moved rapidly and our researchers have seemingly done everything. From visiting Northeastern, to finalizing their elevator pitches about their  research project (which they’re presenting tonight), to visiting both the MIT Museum and the Institute of Contemporary Art/ Boston— it's been quite a lot. 

The two museum trips we took emerged as the final steps to help our researchers contextualize 1968, through art and technology. While we were exposed to many new ideas, (womanism and the beginnings of artificial intelligence, to name two), both the museums had another effect: they opened our eyes to the many different styles and elements of exhibitions we could possibly incorporate into our final exhibition. At the ICA and the MIT museum, we saw the power of archival display tables to guide and carry on complex narratives and stories throughout the exhibition, creating a sort of time line for the visitors to follow as they traverse the galleries. 

At the ICA, our researchers were particularly interested in the Kevin Beasley exhibit, which incorporated large-scale fabric and resin based sculptures and interactive sound installations. For many, it was their first time interacting with conceptual, sound based art. Continuing on into the middle and end of our program, I’m almost positive that we will incorporate some sort of sound art or audio piece into our exhibit.

Moving forward, as the youth narrow down their research questions they will begin post individual blog posts discussing their research. Next week Jake will be the first to post, writing about inventions from MIT in 1968.

Thanks for reading!